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of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, silicon valley. they're everywhere at this point. >> who runs them? >> a variety of players. companies that need these for their regular business owns some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. there is also a culture or commerce of renting space in dissenters. those are lesser-known names. one of them will sell you time on servers or space on servers. >> mr. glanz, what is contained inside these warehouse buildings? >> they're fairly boring places to visit. they are stacked with these modular co
>> thank you. thank you to all my house colleagues were with us today. representative don manzullo and leader mcconnell, senator feinstein, john mccain. our thanks and appreciation to mrs. bush and madame secretary for taking time to be here today and the contributions to this effort and your commitment to advancing the cause of freedom and democracy in burma. i would be remiss if i did not mention someone who's not with us today, congressman tom lantos. tom, and his wife and staff, worked so hard on behalf of burma for so many years. i wish he were here to share this moment in history with us because i think today is an amazing day. today is an incredible. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008 when aung san suu kyi was under house arrest that in a few short years she would be standing or sitting with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor as a member of the burmese parliament. back then we thought about granting the metal and extension which may have been the first time a person would have received in the history of the metal the congressiona
, and in essence making us listen to what you had to say and what they had to say. so with that i would like to move forward with the show. yellow boundary around the church. next please. context. we have seen these before. next. i'm not going to try to read these to you. they are in your package, but they are basically issues brought up bit community, by the commission and by individuals and our responses to them. next, please. the last one on this list here addresses bmr units. we are proposing two on-site, bmr units and one in-lieu fee. next, please. i would like to look here. this is kind of like describing the result of the process over the last six months. the major design revisions on the left are all of the parking goes into one basement, with one garbage -- garage entrance. the height has been reduced one full story, and it's actually down to 53'. the mapping along clay, adjacent to 1630 clay. four story against four story the same is true of the larkin. it was at one time a gap that was opening onto larkin between the historic building and our new building so this design is now
for trouble . you got a fuel tax and fuel tax is a huge tax . they are using the argument to get better mileage now. maybe you don't need to do so much. it is based on mileage. >> wayne makes a good point about the privacy issue. transponder tracking my mile it is big brotherish. >> it is and john makes a good argument against it it is a important policy work. it is probably a bad idea. we don't need new tax. the mileage tax could hurt fuel efficient car it is the and questions of heavy congestion times and it is unworkable idea and why the obama administration distanced it. >> we have a trust fund in 2013 and that is to go to the roads. it will be negative and needs a fuel tax to fund it again. >> it is not too long. it will go negative in 2015. the gas tax is raised continuously since it was enacted in the 1950s. they are paying 64 cents a gallon in taxings. why is that the only proposal. it why not freedom. there is it public assets in every country but here at home. la guardia. terrible airport owned by the government. new mexico and new zealand. airports are tradod the stock exchan
for coming along. and jane connors, who is the building manager. she will lead us on a walk through the building as we move along and talk about that as well. this is a fund and a unique place in san francisco, big, open space. a couple of times a week this is filled with a marketplace. >> 100 farmers. they are here on saturday. the farmers market is out front, and also on tuesday's we have about 60 farmers out front. >> and that is on the plaza? >> on saturday it is back here, and on tuesday it is in the front. >> i guess i am interested in what happens. we have a plaza where the ferry boats used to come. what happened? >> the whole backside of the building was originally line for ferryboats. it could handle about 14 boats at one time. the building was built in 1898, and the ferry boats were very popular up until the bay bridge got built in the early 1930's. at that time, the passengers shifted from taking the ferry boats out to going across the bridge and a ferry boat service diminished. >> the cars were a reduction in the use but also led to the development of the freeway in fron
is maria pallante and i am united states registrar of copyrights and director of the u.s. copyright office and i would like to say at the outset that for me this is a very wonderful privilege because as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently gi
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by to go on the record. we'll see you back here monday captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> greta: this s a fox news alert. 74 hours to go before president obama, the senate and the house shove america off the fiscal cliff. let's go to capitol hill fox news chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel live with the latest. >> we are heading into a critical weekend as a final push is made to keep the u.s. economy from going off the fiscal cliff. after a lat
per day and many neighbors are concerned once this conditional use is granted others would be granted and changing the character of the neighborhood even more. we really wanted to stay in san francisco. but we had few choices, because of how expensive the city is. we didn't want the noise. the traffic, the parking problems, that come with so many san francisco neighborhoods. so we looked around and we were thrilled when we found the university mound neighborhood. and we're particularly happy when we found this very quiet block on harvard street with no commercial activity of any sort nearby. and very life traffic. the code mandate that the commission preserve our neighborhoods in san francisco. so that we have the diversity and can offer our citizens affordable, quiet residential streets too, so that they can stay in san francisco, the city that we all love. thank you. >> next speaker, please. >> good evening. my name is stewart gaffney and i live a few houses from the site where the applicants seek to relocate their business. i want to address several points about the application.
me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were paved with gold and found out there were no streets and he had to do the paving, and i think the strongest part of our culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son that never calls" and that is it and i want to welcome the counsel general and his partner and actually we share a vice, and it's called napoli. i think i can say it right. (. [speaking foreign language] . we don't want you to
with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up
-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster dri
stock. that is it and we're still waiting for information that shows us that the market is producing anything. in that income category it's above where our publicly subsidized affordable housing can hit. this is the program that frankly produces housing for the middle-class, who are not able to reach the market. it's impressive over the life of the program. i think you heard a lot of numbers, 1200 units,. that is a good track record. as you all know the housing trust fund was a big package. and within that, and i think really smartly, we don't see it as a giveaway, but we see it as a very intentional and thoughtful policy. it incents on-site bmr to the developer for exchange to producing units, bricks and mortar, permanently affordable housing and developers are rewarded for that. so we should see an increase in the number of bmrs because of that. there is also a piece of trailing legislation that will come before you presumably in the 1st quarter of next year. we think it's a smart idea to make sure that the program is as successful as possible. the idea is to allow more of a ran
elected i have always appreciated that you have mentoring those of us who are entering into the field after you and not a lot of elected officials do that to give their advise and support and i appreciate the support that you have given to me and i also want to say that i have an incredible apt of respect fortitude you have and the honesty and the way you carry yourself as-woman and a woman leader and it's rare to see that type of leadership and those of us in this field admire those qualities about and you see how incredible you have moving through a lot of different types of politics and fundraisings and lots of other things and so i want to thank you again for being that role-model and i appreciate what you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind
it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned today is the chance it meet
are actually reading the entire e i r because i think most of us skim through the e i r's and skim through and but i doubt that most of us go through the e i r's and you turned to me and said, this is actually my third time reading it. that was a standard you set a bar for me when you is he that to me and that was a bar that i felt i had to be able to come close to may be not the third time but, i really do respect that. i have always admired your dedication and the faint that you don't lie to come in unprepared to an ortho argument and i do apologize that i was not able to replace chris daily in that role to continue the lively debates and discussion that is had happened prior to me. i know that you used to be -- there used to be that diagonal dynamic that habe is not as in existence as it was in the past but i'll say one thing sean, in admire ages i did not find that appeal on your birthday and i hope you remember that one when i call on you your birthday when i call on you in work ring for the city and county of fraction and also i have a lot of respect for your love and dedication t
bryant here who is the spokesman in the state and reverend brown and used his zeal and intelligence, his will to fight. he is a preacher, pastor, teacher, musician and a san francisco giant fanatic. [applause] and to all of you here today this issue of violence is a complex and challenging one. no one need to be self rightious about it because there is no instant answer to the things that all of us must. do i am impressed with the religious communities coming together. at least we should know that the issue today is peace is not the absence of noise. it's the presence of justice. when there is no justice there is no peace and when there is poverty and pain people search out for a bomb and put off that bomb. the excitement is that we're here today with each other. we at best can reach out to those who are not here because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san fra
't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,000 pages? >> they are mine. they are my private property. >> what are you going to do with them?
areas that are not covered very well, they can actually use those systems as well. so i did talk about the failure overcasts. i think this is the key portion of our industry, for our company. we want to make sure that we can take into account when these big situations occur and major interruptions happen in particular areas. >> thank you. okay, our last question, have you established standards for resilience in cooperation with other lifeline providers and how systems should perform in an earthquake? >> i'll go ahead and talk about pg&e. i would say first off we've designed our own standards for what should happen in an earthquake or any other major emergency. our electric system is designed to worry about trees and wind and rain, which is what we see the most of, and tends to be the most damaging, but we have our own standards and our own expectations in terms of what our system should be able to withstand. add david pointed out, the risk is that an event will occur that is greater than what you have prepared for. that's always a possibility. in terms of working with others i t
, just immediately taking care of what's in front of us, to a strategic kind of plan that we can now look at and really do the best for the city. >> so the captain and the colonel, through the discussions that took place yesterday, what are some of the things you learned about relating to civilian issues that will exist and how will you be able to help? ?oo ?a northern california has rich and diverse medical response capabilities. it's impressive the types of capabilities, the number of assets, the number of people trained to do these things are. the california national guard has air and land assets that are substantial and can be rapidly deployed to assist the civil responders in their mission to move people, to get things set up, to establish common security. it's a partnership that really needs to happen and is natural. the governor controls the california national guard, he can make forces appear very rapidly in support of a regional disaster, a local emergency or wherever they are needed, and transportation, communication, security logistics capabilities that come to the table rea
, diamonds or even circles. on today's program you will learn how to use various tools to cut circles -- how to use a technique to create perfect applique circles -- and how to identify various quilt styles. >> funding for fons & porter's love of quilting is provided by: >> for over forty years, baby lock has been dedicated to the love of sewing by creating machines for quilting, sewing embroidery, and serging. baby lock... for the love of sewing; koala studios delivers sewing furniture custom built in america; >> american professional quilting systems... apqs offers a full line of hand-guided quilting machines made in america's heartland for america's artisans; >> reliable corporation... makers of reliable irons. no spitting, no leaking... no kidding; sulky, makers of decorative threads, stabilizers, and books. sulky... express yourself; fabri-quilt.. the fabric of inspiration; omnigrid... providing quilters with specialty rulers and accessories for over twenty-five years; quilters club of america offering patterns and videos to the passionate quilter.
-- >> in the u.s., president obama makes a last ditch attempt to find a budget compromise. >> in the angry and protests in the streets of regain rate. doctors warn the victim's condition is getting worse. >> and running the sydney yacht race for a sixth time. >> within the next hour, president barack obama is set to meet with top republicans to discuss the nation's looming fiscal clit. white house aides have indicated that obama will discuss measures for avoiding the rest of the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that will bite if lawmakers fail to come up with a plan. >> pessimism remains the prevailing mood in washington as the january deadline rapidly approaches. neither democrats nor republicans have any new proposals for a workable compromise. >> the starbucks coffee chain has urged its workers in washington, d.c., area to write "come together" on the cups, a plea for party leaders to work out a compromise, but some customers say that is not enough. >> i mean, i like with starbucks is riding on the cups. i wish they would write, like, something else, like "republicans, stop being s
the embargo's lifted. thomas herzfeld, of thomas herzfled advisors joins us. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! president obama says he's "modestly optimistic" a fiscal deal can be reached in time. he said he's instructed senator harry reid and senator mitch mcconnell to come up with a plan that can pass in congress. his brief comments a short while ago came after a white house meeting today with congressional leaders that ended with no deal. ahead of that, investors lost hope lawmakers can come together in the time remaining. in the last few minutes of trading, stocks sold off. the dow tumbled 158 points, the nasdaq lost 25, and the s&p fell over 15 points. here's darren gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> port: thpresident declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch
. there are two ami tables that we use in san francisco. there is a tri-county, or three county ami table. at one point the board of supervisors directed us to use a san francisco-specific table and given the relative wealth of our adjacent counties to the south and north, san francisco's ami is about 10% lower than the tri-county ami. so san francisco -- 100% ami is equivalent to 90% in san francisco and that is called out here. similarly on the rental side, it coordinates to 55%. >> i understand what you are doing, but i don't really understand why an off-sale unit would be at 70 and not 90? what is the difference between that being on-site and off-site? >> i think my understanding that this policy is a consistent policy that we have had. unfortunately i can't speak to the distinction between those ami levels. how to i believe it's not a new policy. it's consistent with what we have seen previously. >> it's significant for me and any time we approve these projects for sale that was at the tri-county and i understand your adjustment. the other problem is the downward adjustment raises the s
requester's concerns and delayed by months to work with the drr, although they didn't respond to us after one meeting. we twice redesigned the project solely to address their concerns, specifically we created setbacks and square footage and eliminated an entire floor of expansions and lowers the floors among other changes. the dr applicant has failed to demonstrate any exceptional or extraordinary circumstances to justify the dr. contrary to the points, there is no dramatic impact on the mid-block open space. we're merely building on top of an existing concrete deck. the expansion is not uncharacteristically deep or tall and falls behind the dr requester's home. it breaks the rear line of buildings to the east, and falls behind the buildings creating a more harmonious line. it creates a home on top for my family that is smaller or comparable to other homes in the neighborhood. with regards to the petition, we don't know what the dr requester told the people who signed this. if they have concerns, they should have expressed them in the nine months since we had the 311 meeting. we hav
at the capabilities and the resources that we would have available to us in the event of a large-scale emergency. my hat is off to all of you with just how well you've planned, your multitude capabilities, and as secretary schultz said i'll take a note from his confidence of display. to see how you set up in an hour a field hospital to take care of patients, not run of the mill patients, but critically wounded patients. we were so impressed. i think a couple other words the secretary used were impressive and reassuring. that's what it's about, forming partnerships. so, i'm very proud to be not only to be honoring and celebrating our military, but to be partnering once again in cross training. happy to report that a little later today aboard the uss macon, we're learning the best. firefighting below the deck, members on the flight deck learning about aircraft rescue, firefighting. similarly, and i won't be able to stay the whole day today because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members fr
screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidelines, but also you could go organic, you could go local and there are sc
can't be satisfied with just what we've done before because we have the data that shows us more and more where the hot spots are all over the city. and we have also been concentrating on what makes a neighborhood more dangerous for pedestrians, what makes a neighborhood more safer. and i suggest to you tonight that -- or today that in our downtown area is probably one of the most safest areas to walk buzz we pay a lot more attention to that area. but there are a lot of other places where we haven't considered the issues of lowering the speed, as we've done around our schools with walk sf. we haven't done enough study around the data, completed the data of collision and pedestrian injuries as well as we should have to make it safer. so, our pedestrian strategy really is in draft form. we have completed it in this month, and we plan to introduce it throughout the various public agencies and commissions and allow it to be publicly vented. but we do have two very solid goals, and that is by 2016, we want to reduce the number of serious or fatal pedestrian accidents by 25% in the nex
for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> i'm jim cramer, welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> going out of business and they're nuts, they know nothing. >> i always like to say there is a bull market somewhere. >> "mad money," you can't afford to miss it. >> i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." people want to make friends, i'm trying to save you money. call me tonight. tonight i'm letting you in on something big. the method to my madness. i know this show is the craziest, most random, bizarre thing on television, and i also know that you won't find investing advice this good anywhere else. if you're suning in just to see if tonight is the night the show goes off the rails, which it is always a possibility on any given night. sorry, there is a tape delay, keep wishing. for those of you interested in trying to make money, some say i'm a crazy
but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you have given in the time it took you to get that ensued deliver it to us. it is great and generous. i glean from ea
sense that there is a change eric we still reading the way you read of a way that any of us in the audience over the past? >> the one great stories, the sting to places. chance to lot. advertised. changes rapidly. but a work is very popular but also very damaging, complicated. young readers, as you said that will come to him and just did really excited about this aggressively complicated work. >> okay. i think about cognition become especially when you talk about the younger. one of the factors that is important to remember in the digital age which can be very oriented is that when you're learning to read books that are read aloud to less, there is a constant change in the interaction between the reader and the one read too. the one read to is giving a little scam or a little excited. the reader adapts. it's the old story telling. storytelling to an audience, and that is something that the device cannot do. we're learning how to read in need to learn how to understand what is happening, the nuance and the voice that will allow us to go and appreciate the books and taken the
committee, and journalists at fox news contributor judith miller and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, john bolton. joining us now is jon barrasso, member of the senate foreign ofh relations committee. he said the hearing explains stify.y why secretary clinton needs to testify. good to have you with us we. might thank you for having me. >> this is remarkable. i understand the testimony of secretary clinton was tellinggow her what was going on, what was transpiring as to the inadequacy of security. over many months in benghazi. .> is that right? >> that's why we need secretary clinton to testify on thetions record. to answer a numberwh of questio, what she did, did she give anytt orders. the same applies to thed st president of the united states where he was when he was doing, and what heatid did. i have seen the video from the drums, i have seen the video from the security cameras thereu senator risch is absolutely right. most people don't focus on the fact that there were two deaths almost immediately, and the other to the died died about seven hours later. it is hard for me
. they are worried about a bad deal. any deal that gets us past the fiscal cliff is going to be seen as a good deal. >> susie: it seems like we are further apart than last week when president obama gave the last minute pep talk to get the talks going. do we have to reach some point of pain in washington, d.c. that people get mos motivated to geta deal. how does it work in washington? >> i wish i knew.it seems that n ratcratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like the pain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentially a larger agreement. >> susie: real quickly this has been frustrating from everybody from wall street to ceo to average american taxpayers. even the president saw that playing out. how do you seep see this playing out. will we have a deal on monday. >> it'we haven't heard them tal. but
to fishermen about the increasing dangers of working in disputed waters. >> u.s. president barack obama says he still hopes congress can reach agreement to avoid the so- called fiscal cliff. obama met congressional leaders at the white house on friday to discuss a deal. he said the talks were constructive, but did issue a warning on behalf of the american people, demanding congress take action. >> america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you cannot get stuff done in an organized time table, where everything has to wait till the last minute. we are now of the last minute. in the american people are not going to have any patients for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. >> the president said he was modestly optimistic that the january 1 deadline for the fiscal cliff could be averted, but that is contingent on a vote in the senate on a compromise bill, and that will have to get an up or down vote. there is a majority for that, with some tax increases for upper-income people. the question is what level would be acceptable to republicans. more crucial to that is, w
, but they are trying to carve out a deal capable of winning bipartisan support. president obama said the u.s. can't afford a self inflicted wound to our economy. >> fortunate lie congress can prevent it from happening if they act right now. i had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about preventing the tax hike on the middle class and we should be able to reach an agreement to pass both house necessary time. >> senate leaders can't strike a deal. it would be a plan c. keeping tax cuts for those making $250,000 or less . extending unemployment benefits and delay dramatic spending cuts until later next year. >> they realize it is it a critical time. >> we are engaged in discussion majority leader and myself and the white house in the hopes we can come forward sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make and we'll be working hard to try to get there in the next 24 hours. >> sources say house spheeker bone bone deferred to the senate and house would consider or amend the plan and not expected to be included is the d
, house democrat leader nancy pelosi told us she's at least a little encouraged. >> it was constructive. as i say, candor is constructive, and i think it moved us forward, but we'll see. >> reporter: it was the first meeting with the president and all the congressional leaders in six weeks. it follows an impasse that has shaken wall street, the dow down more than 400 points since talks stalled last week. and on main street, business owners like drew greenblatt, who owns a wire basket manufacturing company in baltimore, say the coming fiscal cliff is already causing pain because they just don't know what will happen to their taxes. >> right now we're doing our budget. we're deciding how many people we're hiring next year. we're figuring out how many robots and machines we'll invest in our factories. >> reporter: and across the country all the political bickering had people outraged with washington. >> i can't believe we've gotten this close. >> time for them to turn in their term paper. >> this is america. they should be working for the american people. >> the parties are trying to outdo
that's what this is really about. in my opinion it is incumbent upon us as a local community to understand where our gaps, are understand what we will need in a time of crisis and understand how best to dovetail with the resources coming in. the military does what the military does and they can be incredible flexible. they can bring a lot of stuff to bear that we can never even imagine. it's our job to understand where those hard stops are for them and how they are best suited, because we can build out our plans in anticipation of that. in the case of, say, medical surge, we can look forward and say this is what we're going to need. we're going to need help with patient movement. we're going to need help with the chronickly ill because by the time the military arrives, a day or so into it at least, even with the best of plans, we're going to have to start figuring out how do we manage those chronic patients and you know what, moving stuff is what they're really good at. moving patients in particular, they are amazing. so we start to look at things like that. as we look
and for companies. there's a lot of money on the table to be used to create the kind of dynamic social safety net. the problem is we've sort of let it stay off the table in term of revenue and we can afford to provide the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companies. but the rise of contingent labor, the rise of long-term unemployment and collapse of the local labor market have created incredible problems for workers. that flexibility has not worked for workers. >> there are problems that workers are experiencing that probably due to globalization and other things, it's causing a bad scene for workers in general. but these developments aren't necessarily making it worse. they are just going along with the badness there. like, for example -- >> i don't know about that. there are 64,000 workers in georgia who are going into christmas just having been kicked out of earned unemployment benefits. why? because
years ago. i don't know about you, listening to the folks that pushed us to the brink of the fiscal cliff. a little hard to take him at his neck? that's my "two cents more". that's it for tonight "willis report." thank you for joining us. don't forget to tape the show. if you can't testify. have a great night speak you can even come everybody. a state department report leaves more questions than answers on why the united states failed to act on the diplomatic mission in libya on the 11th of september. the lack of security at the benghazi compound, senator jim frisch that the obama administration fell short in more than one respect and had more than enough time talk about when it began. here's a recent senate foreign relation hearing with twos top state officials. >> i look at those people streaming through the front gate in benghazi. that wouldn't have taken that much to stop that attack, if indeed they would have responded to immediately. again, you are looking at film, and i understand it's a lot more sterile than actually being there on the ground of the time, but when people are
shape right now. san francisco public utilities commission commission tells us it's reservoirs at 83% of capacity. and east bay mun nis wall direct at combined 85%. and lexington is at 63%, plenty of room for more rain. let take a look now at liveéycw doppler 7 hd. sandhya? >> some areas are actually getting wet right now as you look at our radar, combining with national weather service radar around monterey bay. keeping you ahead of the storm, and we're seeing some mixed precipitation right around cobb mountain. you'll notice here, bottle walk road, the pink is an indication of mixed precipitation just east of yu kia. taking you in towards other parts of the bay area, fort ross, towards jennifer, highway 1, moderate rain and some spotty, light returns there. san bruno. very light returns in shar park road. here is a look at timing. 7:00 tonight we have rain along coastline. you'll notice that as we head into 10:00 or 11:00 smrks advances inland could continue to see some snow up into mountains north of us and around mount hamilton. 5:00 a.m. is lking at showers, the question will t
down. the way that government sources are used is crucial. there are some things like advancement and research and primary school we need the government money but it has to be controlled. >> thank you, sir. next, you want to live to be 150? my next guest says the first person to do so my have already been born. it might be you. do you want to live to be 150? i don't. how advances in medicine may change everything. .so asasasasas >> most of human history people died by age 30. 30 year was the average life span for thousands of years. only with the industrial revolution did that change and it changed quickly by 1850 the average life span was almost 40. 50 years later, 47. by 1950, it was up to 68. now, the average in america is 78. 76 for men and 81 for women. the numbers will only go up. and up. the. >> their of a book called "100 plus, the coming age of longevity will change everything." everything? >>guest: everything. >> how much longevity? >>guest: i take the premise it will be possible in for average life expectancy to go up to 150. >> there is someone alive today who will liv
-2500 people in the u.s. generally speaking a disease as rare if it afflicts fewer than 200,000 people. many of these diseases are genetic. but in truth, there's nothing rare about rare diseases. >> conditions like for instance, hearing loss or deafness, there's many genes that can -- in which mutati can lead to hearing impairment. but in one specific family an individual single gene will be responsible. so in the mixture of the phenotype of how many people can have hearing impairment it's not as rare as people think it is. the same goes for conditions like developmental delay or even birth defects. 2-3% of all children are born with a major birth defect no matter where you do the studies around the world and that is a significant% of the population. they have different kinds of birth defects and the individual birth defect might be considered a rare defect like the general heart defect or kidney defect. but actually there is many children that are born with birth defects. >> here in the u.s. there are more than 7,000 rare diseases affecting 25 million children and adults. studying the dna o
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